Traditional metal braces have been used to straighten countless teeth resulting in countless beautiful smiles. However, there is a downside to braces that many don’t discover until too late. While it is clear that orthdontics make toothbrushing difficult, many don’t realize the effects of incomplete brushing can last decades after the orthodontic treatment has completed.

Since thorough toothbrushing is the best tool for combating plaque build-up, and braces block access to all teeth and interdental surfaces, people with braces should take extra care and employ alternate cleaning methods to maintain good oral health.

When plaque forms on teeth, the bad bacteria that normally lives in the mouth increases. This, in turn can inflame the gums. The gums are sensitive and can also recede from teeth moving as part of the realignment process. Since braces put stress on the bone, (and the gums by extension), inflammation can occur which can lead to gum recession. In fact, according to the European Journal of Dentistry, about 400,000 Americans develop gum recession and gum disease from braces every year.

While braces can be the root cause of gum and teeth problems, this is something that can be overcome by taking specific care to manage the oral health while teeth are being treated with hardware. Also, while the primary reason for orthodontia is really cosmetic, braces often fix teeth crowding and ultimately result in better oral hygiene.

Family history matters too. Some people are lucky to inherit thick gum tissue, yet others inherit thin gum tissue and have a much higher risk of recession. Gum disease and recession depends on a patient’s genetics and anatomy. Braces may spark or accelerate these genetic predispositions.

One of the best ways to keep teeth healthy during the realignment process is to have additional dental cleanings at our dentist office here in Mesa. These cleanings allow the dental team to closely monitor any potential problems and provide cleaning of those hard-to-reach places. Give us a call to schedule your next appointment.

Have you ever wondered how often you should replace your toothbrush? If you are asking, the answer probably is… now! To maintain optimal dental health, it is important to replace your toothbrush every three months, after any illnesses, or when your toothbrush is exposed to airborne germs or chemicals.

The American Dental Association (ADA) recommends that you replace your toothbrush every three months because the bristles start showing their wear and are less effective. Additionally, germs, fungus and bacteria can build up and stick to the bristles—causing a situation where you could get an infection (or re-infected with a cold) if you use a toothbrush that has been exposed to these germs.

How to Keep your Toothbrush Clean?

After use, keep your toothbrush clean by rising off and then shaking the toothbrush to get off extra water. Store with the head side up, and keep it from touching other toothbrushes. When traveling, cover the toothbrush to avoid it from touching other things in your bags. Once a week, soak the toothbrush for 10 minutes in an alcohol-based mouthwash, such as Listerine. This will also help keep germs at bay.

Don’t Remember When Your Got Your Toothbrush?
If the bristles of the toothbrush have started to fray and fan out, and/or are worn you should treat yourself in a new toothbrush. Some people get on a new toothbrush schedule for example: January 1, April 1, July 1, October 1. For anywhere from $1 to $3, a toothbrush is a great investment in your oral health!

Replacing your toothbrush is an easy, and inexpensive way to care for your oral health. Combine great self-care with regular dental maintenance appointments to help minimize any major issues. Contact us today to schedule your next appointment.

The practice of dentistry has existed since 7000 BC, and yet it continues to evolve. Due to new technology and techniques, dentistry is a changing and growing industry. New technologies and innovations such as 3D printing, tele-dentistry and “smart-toothbrushes” are right around the corner! Here’s a look at some of the new, exciting technology when it comes to dental care and treatment.

1) Tele-dentistry
Not everyone has the ability to get to a dentist. Some patients live in more remote areas and others have mobility issues that make it difficult to get to the dentist office. As tele-dentistry spreads, access to dental care increases for patients who cannot otherwise get to the dentist office. Through the use of video conferencing, images taken by smart phone, and a caregiver who can assist in the image-taking and provide observations, a dentist can provide care recommendations, are refer the patient for further treatment if necessary.

2) Smart Toothbrush
You have a smart phone. Maybe you have a smart thermostat or a smart refrigerator. And pretty soon, you may have a smart-toothbrush! Bluetooth connected toothbrushes have monitors and games to help increase brushing time. 3D maps of your teeth may be made by the toothbrushes of the future that can report if you are brushing thoroughly and warns if you are brushing too hard at a certain area. 

3) Computer-assisted Design & 3D Printing

Computer-assisted design allows digital labs to quickly create a custom design of things like veneers, or crowns, and 3D printing can then manufacture that dental appliance. In fact, 3D printing has been shown to have countless uses. For medical professionals in areas outside of major cities, 3D printing can help doctors create medicines, prosthetics, tools, and other items not readily available. The process of computer-assisted design, followed by computer assisted manufacturing cuts down significantly on both the time and effort needed to provide quality dental options to people around the world.

4) Better and Smaller Cameras

Dentists need to have a good view of the teeth, gums, and mouth in order to provide a comprehensive exam and cleaning. Yet, until recently, cameras were too big to allow the dentist to get a good view. New intra-oral cameras have revolutionized this procedure and advances continue to show promising results, improving comfort for the patient and ease-of-use and results for the dentist.

5) Growing Back Broken Teeth

Dental regeneration seems to be on the horizon of dental care with bioactive replacements for dentine. Stem cell technology research is starting to present more discoveries that indicate that growing new teeth as adults may be in our future. In a Newsweek article from April 2016, it was reported that scientists from the University of Nottingham and Harvard University developed dental fillings that stimulate teeth to heal themselves with the use of stem cells to grow dentin.

Innovations in healthcare have stunning potential for the future of dentistry. It is certainly an exciting time to be alive!

5) Are Dental Veneers Right for Me?

Having good health and oral aesthetics is very important for the confidence and self-esteem of many people. Who doesn’t want to have a beautiful smile? Dental veneers can be a great alternative to improve oral aesthetics at a reasonable price, without long and complicated treatments and any risk.

What is a Dental Veneer?

The dental veneer is a small sheet that is placed in the visible part of the tooth to mask or cover problems caused by infections such as caries, poor previous restorations, enamel fractures, mold changes and changes in color to improve your external image.

What are Dental Veneers Used For?

Regardless of the causes of unattractive teeth, dental veneers can solve most or even all of your cosmetic dental problems, including:

Worn enamel: Over time, the thin, translucent and hard substance that covers the teeth (the enamel) can wear out and become discolored. Such wear and discoloration may be natural or be the result of a genetic predisposition. However, it is often the result of consuming soda, tea or coffee, smoking, and the use of certain medications, etc.


Use and wear: Teeth naturally wear out with age. The teeth of older people are more prone to wear, cracks or a generally uneven appearance.


Genetics: Some people are born with an abnormal separation between teeth that enlarges with age.


Uneven teeth: Uneven teeth can result from injury or general wear.

Process of Dental Veneers

The process of placing veneers usually begins with the removal of some of the tooth enamel to ensure that the dental veneers have a good surface to be permanently attached to the teeth. The amount of enamel removed is small and in fact, it is the same thickness as the veneer to be placed so that the tooth remains the same size. A local anesthetic can be used to ensure that no discomfort occurs during the application process, however this is usually not necessary.

Once the teeth have been prepared, an impression will be made so that the dental technician has enough information to make the dental veneer. If some teeth are left unveneered, the color of the other veneer chosen corresponds in a color guide will ensure that the veneers match and look completely natural.

Placing a veneer usually requires at least two visits; The first visit is to prepare the tooth and make sure it matches the veneer, while the second visit is to place the veneer. Before carrying out the procedure, the dentist shows the patient the dental veneer on his tooth to make sure he is happy with it.

How Long Do Dental Veneers Last?

Dental veneers can last for many years, however, there is always a risk that they may splinter or break just like the teeth themselves. In general, the dentist is the one who tells the patient how long each veneer will last, in addition to the need for a new veneer if necessary.

How Much Do Dental Veneers Cost?

The cost of dental veneers may vary depending on the type of veneer chosen.

In general, porcelain veneers are more expensive than composite veneers, costing between $800 and $3,000 dollars per tooth, while composite veneers have prices ranging from $200 to $2000 dollars per tooth.

If you are interested in learning more about the veneer process, or scheduling your appointment for a veneer consultation, contact us here at North Stapley Dental Care.

Dental plaque is a biofilm of bacteria and sugar that constantly forms on our teeth. The problem with dental plaque is that it is acidic and can actually break down the enamel of the tooth and cause cavities to form.

Plaque can also irritate your gums which can cause a variety of problems such as gingivitis. Plaque is the primary cause of gum disease and cavities. One of the most effective and easy ways to take care of and control plaque is by brushing your teeth regularly and thoroughly at a minimum of twice a day. It is important to know some of the key ingredients in toothpaste such as: fluoride, flavor, detergents, abrasives, and treatment additives. One of the best ways to find the best toothpaste for you is to ask your dentist by contacting us at (480) 470-6803.

Here are some of the top toothpaste types and some reasons to use it.

Repair and Protect Toothpastes

If you have been using whitening toothpaste and too much pressure you can actually wear down the enamel and create sensitivity which may be uncomfortable. Repair and Protect toothpastes are less abrasive on sensitive teeth and can help strengthen or repair weaker enamel.

Charcoal Whitening Toothpastes

Absorptive qualities and mild abrasives bind the bacteria and help lift impurities out of the teeth.

Complete Care/ Multipurpose

If you are like many others and have gotten your oral care down to a T, then a total -all-around “complete” toothpaste might be for you. This type of toothpaste is great general toothpaste, but isn’t recommended if you are trying to target any dental concerns you have.

Baking Soda/ Non-Peroxide Whitening

A lot of whitening toothpastes will have peroxide inside which can create sensitivity, but a baking soda-based is a great alternative. The toothpaste will lift deeper and stronger stains than a lot of other toothpaste brands.

If you are looking for a specific recommendation for your mouth and teeth, or would like any more information or would like to see which brand your dentist would suggest, please contact us for a consultation by clicking this link.

You often go to the store, compare different kinds of toothpaste & choose the best for your family. But are you aware of the ingredients packed in that tube?

What is in Your Toothpaste?

Have you ever stood at the toothpaste aisle, and wondered how to choose the best one? They all promise clean white teeth—so what is the difference? Truth is, toothpastes are all pretty similar when you look at the ingredients. So, let’s take a look at what makes a toothpaste.

Almost Every Toothpaste Contains:

Binders – Binders thicken the toothpaste and hold the solid and liquid components together. This is especially important during the storage and transportation of the product. Binders also affect the speed and volume of toothpaste foam production, how the flavor release and product dispersal, the appearance of the toothpaste, and how well it rinses off the toothbrush.

Abrasives – Abrasives are used to scrub the outside of the teeth to get rid of plaque and loosen particles on teeth. Abrasives may affect the paste’s consistency, cost, and taste and opacity. Some abrasives are harsher than others. And we do advise our patients not to choose a very abrasive paste for this reason as the can sometimes result in unnecessary damage to the tooth enamel. The best option often contains a combination of abrasives.

Sudsers – Sudsers are also known as foaming agents and give toothpaste that
bubbly feeling. The sudsers also lower the surface tension of water so that bubbles are formed from the paste. Sudsers help remove particles from teeth.

Humectants – Humectants keep the solid and liquid parts of toothpaste together and retain water. They also can add a coolness and/or sweetness to the toothpaste which makes toothpaste taste and feel pleasant in the mouth when used.

Flavor (unique additives) – Toothpastes have flavors to make them more palatable. Mint is the most common flavor used because it imparts a feeling of freshness, however there are other popular flavors such as spearmint, peppermint, wintergreen, and cinnamon.

Sweeteners – In addition to flavors, toothpastes contain sweeteners to make it taste palatable.

Fluorides – Fluorides reduce decay by increasing the strength of teeth. Sodium fluoride is the most commonly used fluoride. 

Tooth whitener – Sodium perborate is used as a tooth whitening ingredient. Tooth whiteners remove or reduce stains on the tooth enamel. Not all toothpastes contain a tooth whitener, but many do.

Preservative – Most toothpastes contain the preservative p-hydrozybenzoate. This allows the toothpaste to last during storage, transportation and while sitting on your bathroom sink!

The thing that makes toothpastes, or more effective, is not really the base ingredients, but the quantity of each. More abrasive toothpastes can harm enamel, less sudsy toothpastes don’t produce the bubble effect necessary to get to all surfaces, and texture, flavor and appearance go a long way in how comfortable we are with using the product. If you have questions about the brands of toothpaste that we recommend at the North Stapley Dental Care office, just give us a call at (480) 418-0459 ask at your next appointment.

Want to know what dental practices are popular in other parts of the world? Like in Asia, people use an anti-bacterial plant’s twigs to clean their teeth.

Dental Techniques Around the World

Have you ever wondered how people around the world manage their day-to-day dental care?

For the most part, families in the U.S. and other developed countries use plastic and nylon toothbrushes and pre-packaged toothpaste. Yet, most of the world’s population, especially indigenous cultures and developing countries, still use age-old techniques to clean their teeth that do not involve shopping the dental aisle of the local supermarket.

If you have ever travelled to parts of the world where dental care is not commercialized, or not available, you may have seen the result of missing teeth and gum disease. But just as likely, you were met with big smiles of bright healthy teeth. How is this possible? Truth is, there are many people around the world that do a great job caring for their teeth with the tools and materials they have available to them from nature. Here are just a few examples:Sticks & Twigs

Sticks or twigs are used by several people around the work and are the planet’s earliest “toothbrush”. In most cases, the bark of the stick is removed (chewed or cut away) and the pulp on the inside is rubbed against the teeth.

Powders & Pastes

In parts of rural India, Africa, Southeast Asia and South America, people use a mixture of powders and pastes to keep their mouths clean and fresh. These various ingredients have different properties that either clean teeth, or arrest the growth of bacteria. They contain granular versions of different ingredients such as:

Does this mean you should go out and find a twig to clean your teeth, or brush with salt—no! People around the world have techniques passed on for generations and combine these tooth cleaning options with a diet and lifestyle that may help them avoid cavities. They have the knowledge and understanding of what combinations to use of these ingredients as not to cause damage—and even so they may still suffer from preventable dental issues. In addition, most Americans have a diet that promotes tooth decay, and we must brush at least twice a day to counteract what the sugars, and processed starches do to our teeth. Many people around the world have diets that don’t promote plaque growth as many modern Americans do.

We are fortunate to have a dental care system and products which make oral hygiene relatively easy here. But that does not mean that there aren’t other very good solutions for the people of the world living different lives from our own.

For more information on dental care around the world, check out <a href="http://Want to know what dental practices are popular in other parts of the world? Like in Asia, people use an anti-bacterial plant’s twigs to clean their teeth. Read more 5. Dental Techniques Around the World Have you ever wondered how people around the world manage their day-to-day dental care? For the most part, families in the U.S. and other developed countries use plastic and nylon toothbrushes and pre-packaged toothpaste. Yet, most of the world’s population, especially indigenous cultures and developing countries, still use age-old techniques to clean their teeth that do not involve shopping the dental aisle of the local supermarket. If you have ever travelled to parts of the world where dental care is not commercialized, or not available, you may have seen the result of missing teeth and gum disease. But just as likely, you were met with big smiles of bright healthy teeth. How is this possible? Truth is, there are many people around the world that do a great job caring for their teeth with the tools and materials they have available to them from nature. Here are just a few examples: Sticks & Twigs Sticks or twigs are used by several people around the work and are the planet’s earliest “toothbrush”. In most cases, the bark of the stick is removed (chewed or cut away) and the pulp on the inside is rubbed against the teeth. Arab Bedouin tribes clean their teeth by using the twigs from an arak tree. Some Muslim and African cultures use a stick called a miswak, which naturally contains a concentration of fluoride. Hindu Brahmins and priests clean their teeth using wood from the cherry tree. In some rural areas of India, people use mango, cashew or coconut tree twigs to clean their teeth. Powders & Pastes In parts of rural India, Africa, Southeast Asia and South America, people use a mixture of powders and pastes to keep their mouths clean and fresh. These various ingredients have different properties that either clean teeth, or arrest the growth of bacteria. They contain granular versions of different ingredients such as: Brick Charcoal Rangoli powder Mud Salt Ash Does this mean you should go out and find a twig to clean your teeth, or brush with salt—no! People around the world have techniques passed on for generations and combine these tooth cleaning options with a diet and lifestyle that may help them avoid cavities. They have the knowledge and understanding of what combinations to use of these ingredients as not to cause damage—and even so they may still suffer from preventable dental issues. In addition, most Americans have a diet that promotes tooth decay, and we must brush at least twice a day to counteract what the sugars, and processed starches do to our teeth. Many people around the world have diets that don’t promote plaque growth as many modern Americans do. We are fortunate to have a dental care system and products which make oral hygiene relatively easy here. But that does not mean that there aren’t other very good solutions for the people of the world living different lives from our own. For more information on dental care around the world, check out this article. this article. . You can visit North Stapley dental care or, give a call on (480) 418-0459.

Needing a root canal can sound scary for many. The root canal procedure is often misunderstood. While is the procedure can be complex and fairly invasive, it is a routine procedure with a high success rate.

Here are a few more Root Canal facts to help you understand this simple dental procedure:

1. Surgery. The root canal procedure is a minor surgery. The infected part of the root of the tooth is accessed, cleaned and filled through to the end. So, while it is routine, it is taken very seriously and performed only by a dentist or endodontist.

2. Options. The alternative to a root canal, in most cases, is to extract the tooth and either leave the space or fill it with a bridge or implant. Depending on your unique situation, you and your dentist can make the best decision for you. As with anything, there are pros and cons.

3. Success Rate. Root canal treatment is successful 50-80% of the time. Success rates have dramatically increased in the last 10 years. (Read more from the CDA here).

4. Cost. Cost for a root canal varies, but most dental insurance will cover a percentage of the procedure. If you don’t have insurance, we offer a Saving Plan designed to help lower the costs of these treatments. If you have concerns, our team can walk you through your options and the costs.

5. Time. The procedure takes about an hour. The first day will be the hardest. Your dentist will provide you with a  pain relief regiment, which will consist of over the counter medicines, or a prescription for a pain reliever. Most people choose to take the day off of work following a root canal. Pain should subside after several days.

6. The Root Canal Treatment. After the canals (the nerve and the pulp of the tooth) are cleaned, they will be filled with a composite material and a temporary filling will be placed. Without treatment, the tissue surrounding the tooth will become infected and abscesses may form.

7. Next steps. A new crown will be added after the tooth and gums have had time for healing. This follow-up appointment will take about an hour and is usually scheduled before you leave the office on the day of the root canal. If you have pain after 1 week, or if you develop a fever, please contact the office immediately.

Root canals are a common and safe procedure that will allow the patient to save a tooth after severe decay. If you want more information about root canals or need to have one done, we are happy to make you a consultation appointment today. Just give us a call and we will get your scheduled!


What do you really know about tooth decay? Is it inevitable? Is sugar really bad? We’ve compiled 7 facts you should know to better protect your oral health.

1. Watch what you eat. Dental decay is triggered by the things we eat. Foods and drinks also feed the bacteria that lives on our mouths and these bacteria produce the acids that gradually dissolve the enamel of the teeth causing decay.

2. Plaque builds up. The plaque that grows on teeth can build up when not brushed regularly. This plaque produces the acids break down the teeth, which in turn creates cavities and gum disease.

3. Sugar really is bad for teeth. Food which contains sugars (such as sodas, juice, processed foods, carbohydrates, etc.) can cause faster buildup of plaque and our teeth can be damaged faster when these are in our diet. BUT… it is important to know the sugar is not what is causing tooth decay. Sugar feeds the bacteria that causes tooth decay. (So remember to brush after that sweet snack!)

4. Yes, you do need to see the dentist. Early in the cycle of tooth decay, there are no symptoms, the teeth will not hurt, and the cavities can only be seen on an x-ray. Your dentist office is set up specifically to take these facial x-rays.

5. Location, location, location. Biting surfaces of molars are the most likely locations of decay, because food often gets stuck there, and is not easily brushed away.

6. You’re not alone. The majority of adults have had to have at least one tooth removed. Sometimes this is due to space in the mouth (i.e. wisdom teeth), for others it is because of extreme decay or injury.

7. Don’t be afraid! Fourteen percent of people are scared to go to the dentist. Many avoid appointments and eventually suffer more tooth decay. If you suffer from dental anxiety, we can offer safe sedation options to help you through your visit.

Tooth decay is preventable and reversible in the early stages! It is imperative to make smart decisions about food & drink, brush & floss regularly and visit the dental office at least twice a year. Is it time for your next appointment? Call us today to schedule today.

The importance of regular cleanings

When you visit the dentist for a regular check-up and cleaning, you will often be asked to make another appointment in 6 months. But have you ever wondered “why every 6 months?”

The truth is, there is nothing specifically magical about 6 months, and in some countries, a different routine is suggested. However, in the United States, many dental insurance companies use 6 months as a benchmark, and will pay for routine checkups just once every 6 months. Fortunately, this is a good duration of time to monitor teeth for changes.

There are times when regular cleanings should happen more frequently. For example, in the case of teens with braces, we often like to do a cleaning every 3 or 4 months. We recommend this in some patients because braces make it very difficult to get the teeth clean, and teens tend to be less than meticulous at times. We discuss this option with parents if we see that the normal brushing is not cleaning all teeth well in our adolescent patients.

Regular cleanings more frequently than 6 months are also a good option for people with overlapping teeth, or who have experienced a health issue such as periodontal disease. When you meet with your dentist, be sure to ask if you could benefit from cleanings at a shorter interval.

Now, sometimes it is not possible to make the regular dental cleaning right at that 6-month mark. Vacations, school schedules, family obligations and work often conflict with the appointment made 6 months prior. And that is understandable! Just let us know when you are able to reschedule your cleaning.

As always, we are here to answer your dental questions. In Mesa, AZ? Give us a call at (480) 447-1903 to schedule your consultation.

Pregnant women have a unique set of circumstances that affect their teeth, however, having dental check-ups and cleanings is safe and important during pregnancy.

Dental cleanings during pregnancies.
Preventive dental care while pregnant is essential to avoid oral infections such as gum disease, which has been linked to preterm birth. Since the rise in hormone levels during pregnancy cause problems, many women report increased gum bleeding and irritation which can lead to these infections. Good dental care at home and regular dental cleanings are important throughout pregnancy.

What about other dental work during pregnancy?

Dental work that reduces the chance of infections such as a required cavity filling or crowns, should be done. If dental work is done during pregnancy, we recommend the second trimester since lying on your back for an extended period of time later in pregnancy can be uncomfortable.

What about dental emergencies during pregnancy?
The best and safest bet is to postpone unneeded dental work when you’re pregnant, however sometimes emergency dental work is required. In these situations, we will advise you on the safest options.

What about medications during pregnancy?

We do not recommend using medications for pain relief during dental work unless necessary. Currently, there are conflicting studies about possible adverse effects of medicines used for dental procedures during pregnancy. However, medications such as antibiotics used to fight infection are safe. It’s best to discuss the options with your dentist and obstetrician.

Discussing Medications for Pregnancy and Dental Care from North Stapley Dental Care.

Are dental x-rays safe during pregnancy?

Routine x-rays, typically taken during preventative appointments, can usually be postponed until after the birth. X-rays are necessary to perform many dental procedures, especially emergencies. However, having dental X-rays during your pregnancy is considered safe with appropriate shielding by the American Dental Association and American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.

If you are pregnant, or may be pregnant, please let your hygienist know at your appointment, or inform the receptionist when you make the appointment. We will work with you to give you the best appropriate care, and make modifications, or postponements as appropriate for your pregnancy and dental care.