The most famous dental practices around the world

Want to know what dental practices are popular in other parts of the world? Like in Asia, people use an anti-bacterial plant’s twigs to clean their teeth.

Dental Techniques Around the World

Have you ever wondered how people around the world manage their day-to-day dental care?

For the most part, families in the U.S. and other developed countries use plastic and nylon toothbrushes and pre-packaged toothpaste. Yet, most of the world’s population, especially indigenous cultures and developing countries, still use age-old techniques to clean their teeth that do not involve shopping the dental aisle of the local supermarket.

If you have ever travelled to parts of the world where dental care is not commercialized, or not available, you may have seen the result of missing teeth and gum disease. But just as likely, you were met with big smiles of bright healthy teeth. How is this possible? Truth is, there are many people around the world that do a great job caring for their teeth with the tools and materials they have available to them from nature. Here are just a few examples:Sticks & Twigs

Sticks or twigs are used by several people around the work and are the planet’s earliest “toothbrush”. In most cases, the bark of the stick is removed (chewed or cut away) and the pulp on the inside is rubbed against the teeth.

  • Arab Bedouin tribes clean their teeth by using the twigs from an arak tree.
  • Some Muslim and African cultures use a stick called a miswak, which naturally contains a concentration of fluoride.
  • Hindu Brahmins and priests clean their teeth using wood from the cherry tree.
  • In some rural areas of India, people use mango, cashew or coconut tree twigs to clean their teeth.

Powders & Pastes

In parts of rural India, Africa, Southeast Asia and South America, people use a mixture of powders and pastes to keep their mouths clean and fresh. These various ingredients have different properties that either clean teeth, or arrest the growth of bacteria. They contain granular versions of different ingredients such as:

  • Brick
  • Charcoal
  • Rangoli powder
  • Mud
  • Salt
  • Ash

Does this mean you should go out and find a twig to clean your teeth, or brush with salt—no! People around the world have techniques passed on for generations and combine these tooth cleaning options with a diet and lifestyle that may help them avoid cavities. They have the knowledge and understanding of what combinations to use of these ingredients as not to cause damage—and even so they may still suffer from preventable dental issues. In addition, most Americans have a diet that promotes tooth decay, and we must brush at least twice a day to counteract what the sugars, and processed starches do to our teeth. Many people around the world have diets that don’t promote plaque growth as many modern Americans do.

We are fortunate to have a dental care system and products which make oral hygiene relatively easy here. But that does not mean that there aren’t other very good solutions for the people of the world living different lives from our own.

For more information on dental care around the world, check out <a href="http://Want to know what dental practices are popular in other parts of the world? Like in Asia, people use an anti-bacterial plant’s twigs to clean their teeth. Read more 5. Dental Techniques Around the World Have you ever wondered how people around the world manage their day-to-day dental care? For the most part, families in the U.S. and other developed countries use plastic and nylon toothbrushes and pre-packaged toothpaste. Yet, most of the world’s population, especially indigenous cultures and developing countries, still use age-old techniques to clean their teeth that do not involve shopping the dental aisle of the local supermarket. If you have ever travelled to parts of the world where dental care is not commercialized, or not available, you may have seen the result of missing teeth and gum disease. But just as likely, you were met with big smiles of bright healthy teeth. How is this possible? Truth is, there are many people around the world that do a great job caring for their teeth with the tools and materials they have available to them from nature. Here are just a few examples: Sticks & Twigs Sticks or twigs are used by several people around the work and are the planet’s earliest “toothbrush”. In most cases, the bark of the stick is removed (chewed or cut away) and the pulp on the inside is rubbed against the teeth. Arab Bedouin tribes clean their teeth by using the twigs from an arak tree. Some Muslim and African cultures use a stick called a miswak, which naturally contains a concentration of fluoride. Hindu Brahmins and priests clean their teeth using wood from the cherry tree. In some rural areas of India, people use mango, cashew or coconut tree twigs to clean their teeth. Powders & Pastes In parts of rural India, Africa, Southeast Asia and South America, people use a mixture of powders and pastes to keep their mouths clean and fresh. These various ingredients have different properties that either clean teeth, or arrest the growth of bacteria. They contain granular versions of different ingredients such as: Brick Charcoal Rangoli powder Mud Salt Ash Does this mean you should go out and find a twig to clean your teeth, or brush with salt—no! People around the world have techniques passed on for generations and combine these tooth cleaning options with a diet and lifestyle that may help them avoid cavities. They have the knowledge and understanding of what combinations to use of these ingredients as not to cause damage—and even so they may still suffer from preventable dental issues. In addition, most Americans have a diet that promotes tooth decay, and we must brush at least twice a day to counteract what the sugars, and processed starches do to our teeth. Many people around the world have diets that don’t promote plaque growth as many modern Americans do. We are fortunate to have a dental care system and products which make oral hygiene relatively easy here. But that does not mean that there aren’t other very good solutions for the people of the world living different lives from our own. For more information on dental care around the world, check out this article. this article. . You can visit North Stapley dental care or, give a call on (480) 418-0459.

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